Category Archives: culture

14 unmet needs among Korean Americans and Indian Americans

According to this article in The Intelligencer, “Breaking down cultural barriers,” there are 14 basic “problem areas or unmet need themes” among Koreans and Indians in the northern Philadelphia area:

  • Concerns of the elderly
  • Mental health issues
  • Domestic violence and child abuse
  • Discrimination, lack of power and lack of trust
  • Health and medical issues
  • Health insurance issues
  • Immigration concerns
  • Intragroup conflict
  • Lack of awareness of community services
  • Language issues
  • Generational conflict
  • Poverty
  • Substance abuse and addiction problems
  • Transportation problems

The article also highlights top issues that are specific to the Korean and Indian communities:

The three key themes among Koreans were concerns of the elderly, language issues and mental health issues.

The three key themes among Indians were concerns of the elderly, mental health issues and domestic violence issues.

These findings come from interviews cited in a report titled “Koreans and Asian Indians in the North Penn Area”, compiled by Family Services of Montgomery County and funded by the North Penn Community Health Foundation.

Do you find similar needs in your Asian American community? What can be done to better address these issues?

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Conversation about Homosexuality & the Asian American Christian Church

I just got word of this special event from Pastor Ken Fong of Evergreen LA . This conversation is especially for Southern California Asian American evangelical churches and they are making a short film about this for release in the coming year.

Saturday, May 10, 7:00 p.m. @ Sanctuary of Evergreen Baptist Church of Los Angeles www.ebcla.org

WE NEED TO TALK: A Conversation about Homosexuality & the Asian American Christian Church. Sponsored by the Christian Social Issues (CSI) group, an informal gathering of Asian American Christians who discuss wide-ranging social issues and how they relate to our Christian faith. Join three old friends – two straight and one gay – who will engage in a conversation that needs to happen more often in order to dispel ignorance, quell fear and hatred, and foster greater understanding. Debate about scriptural interpretation or scientific evidence is not within the scope of this dialogue. It is not our intent to resolve this highly complex issue. Though we may ultimately arrive at different conclusions, at the very least, we need to break the awful silence in our churches surrounding this subject. We really need to talk.

If you have a friend or loved one who is gay, or you are gay yourself, or you are a Christian who is concerned about this issue, please join us in this much needed and long-awaited dialogue.

why God made you an Asian American

Russell Jeung (Associate Professor of Asian Studies at San Francisco State University) gave 4 talks at the first Asian American conference hosted by Bread of Life Church in Torrance, California, March 7-9. We recorded the first talk from Friday night. (Videos from all the talks may be made available later, but no guarantees.)
Russell Jeung
With permission from Russell Jeung, we are grateful for being able to post the first talk online. Here’s the audio (mp3, running time = 75:41) and slides from his March 7th presentation titled, “Daniel 2: Asian American Values of Wisdom, Community, and Humility” >>


Religiosity in Asian America: Spiritual Vitality, Secularism, and Racialization

Sat in parts of the Symposium on Religion in Los Angeles, a 2-day event jointly hosted by Cal State University Los Angeles and Claremont School of Theology. Fascinating conversations and presentations that exemplified the growing interest in the sociology of religion, and most of the presentations explored the inter-relationship of religions and ethnicities.

Russell JeungRussell Jeung, Associate Professor of Asian Studies at San Francisco State University, made an insightful presentation titled “Religiosity in Asian America: Spiritual Vitality, Secularism, and Racialization.”

With permission from Russell Jeung, we are grateful for being able to post yesterday’s talk online. Here’s the audio (mp3 – run time = 42:17) and slides from his March 6th presentation about Asian American religious affiliation >>


I thought slides #3 and #4 were most interesting, charting out the religious affiliation of Asian Americans, with respondents identifying as Protestant, Catholic, Buddhist, Hindu, Muslim, other, none, or refused. These charts are very timely, as the major survey results by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life was just released last week, and has been highlighted in 300+ news articles. Several other conversations at the symposium responded and interacted with these Pew Forum’s extensive survey results. (also, see video overview about the U.S. Religious Landscape Survey)

Russell would very much like to get your feedback and thoughts about this presentation — please add a comment below.

future of interracial families and churches

Excerpted from the book Microtrends: The Small Forces Behind Tomorrow’s Big Changes by Mark Penn and E. Kinney Zalesne. These statistics give a preview of racial diversity within families (and potentially, churches) in the future::

According to Pew Research Center data from 2006, while the majority of interracial couples include a Hispanic, the most common type of interracial couple (at 14 percent) is a white man married to an Asian woman. Second, at 8 percent, is a black man married to a white woman. (Interestingly, white-Asian pairings are three times as likely to be white men with Asian women as the other way around; and black-white pairings are three times as likely to be black men with white women. Observers have commented on the lagging marriage prospects for black women and Asian men as a result — although those groups do not, as one might expect as a purely mathematical matter, seem to marry each other.)

about Islam and the West, lectures on culture and America

Dr. Jeffrey K. Jue wrote this article to better understand Islam and the West. Dr. Jue is Associate Professor of Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary and an advisor of L2 Foundation. Here’s why he wrote the article:

Some have argued that so many courses in church history are unnecessary for students training for ministry, and those precious and limited classroom hours should be devoted to more directly applicable disciplines. However, I am convinced that history is very applicable for helping us understand our own time and place. The editor of TIME magazine put it well in stating the importance of “explaining the challenges of the moment in the context of history – and relating the values of our history to the challenges of the moment.”

Read the full article over at Truth Matters, Inc. >>

Dr. Jeffrey K. Jue also gave 2 lectures, An Historical Look at Culture (76:46) and America: City Upon a Hill or the Land of Gog and Magog? (79:01). Listen to audios online at wts.edu >>

Connecting with Culture

Here are the slides from my presentation titled Connecting with Culture that was presented at the Render Conference near Houston last week.

You may download the slides from slideshare.net, and download the mp3 audio (35mb) from the 1st session, which includes the presentation and Q&A discussion, a large part on social justice and how both works and faith are part of our witness.

Click on the green “play” button to watch the sync’d up presentation along with the audio.

The audio to the 2nd session of “Connecting with Culture” is also available for listening/downloading. The discussion that followed the presentation in this session discussed how to present the Gospel in a culturally relevant way, serving the community, and arts in the church.